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Elizabeth Blackwell Essay

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  • The First Woman Doctor

    982 words

    I have recently read the story The First Women Doctor. It is about Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female to earn a medical degree. It took her many years and determination, but finally all of her hard work paid off and she got that degree. I will try to explain to you what the story is about. The main character in this story is Elizabeth Blackwell. Her family played a great role in her life. She was born in Britain but moved to the United States, then back to Britain. She was twenty-eight when s...
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  • Commission On Human Rights Universal Declaration Of Human Rights

    1,421 words

    There have been many women that have changed and shaped the role of women today. They opened the doors of opportunity for future women and made many contributions to our society. Some of these accomplishments have gone unnoticed. The reason that I chose to discuss the influential women of the past and present was because they are the ones that have given me a future. The purpose of the paper is to show the most influential women in different professions and movements. I want to share some of thi...
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  • Elizabeth Blackwell Medical School

    373 words

    Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman doctor, is a hero because she showed such perseverance to get into and to attend medical school and there after she blazed other trails in the medical profession. Elizabeth was born in Bristol, England on February 3 rd, 1821. Her father, Samuel, owned a sugar refinery and was a very wealthy man. Her father and mother raised Elizabeth with the mind set that girls can be just a smart as boys. They encouraged Elizabeth to follow her dream and to become a doc...
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  • Women And Children Florence Nightingale

    836 words

    On January 23, 1849, a young woman walked across the stage of the Presbyterian Church in Geneva, NY. She was given a degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Geneva Medical College. And she happened to be the very first woman to earn the degree. Her name was Elizabeth Blackwell. Elizabeth Blackwell was born in England on February 3, 1821. She received her childhood education by private tutor. In 1832, her father, Samuel Blackwell, moved her family to the United States. They lived first in New York ...
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  • 19th Century Feminism In America

    1,406 words

    In the nineteenth century, in America, the role women would play in our society began to change dramatically. This was the beginning of a whole new world for women, and America in general. Women began to realize that there were opportunities for them outside of the home, and that they could have a place in the world as well as men. It was a time when the feminist view was being born and traditional views of women were changing. First, women would play a part in working to help slaves gain their ...
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  • Elizabeth Blackwell First Woman

    1,008 words

    ... that he was influenced by the renaissance but on the other his style of research and technique probably dates back to the days of Aristotle and Galen. C) Elizabeth acted as a pioneer because she was the first woman in England to be allowed to become a physician. She inspired every woman aspiring to learn medicine after her. Elizabeth's actions brought womens education forward by 50 years. Elizabeth's father Newson Garrett had 12 children and he owned a pawnshop, which in 1850 became very suc...
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  • Elizabeth Blackwell N Y

    252 words

    Blackwell, Elizabeth (1821 - 1910) Elizabeth Blackwell was born on Feb. 3 1821, in Bristol New York. She was one of the nine children of Samuel Blackwell. Samuel Blackwell was a prosperous sugar refiner. Elizabeth Blackwell and her family moved to N. Y. C. When she was eleven. After her fathers business was destroyed by a fire. Her father died in 1838. Later Elizabeth, her mother and sisters opened a private school. But she was bored with teaching so she decided to pursue a career in medicine. I...
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  • Women And Children Elizabeth Blackwell

    2,731 words

    Do you know who the first woman doctor of the United States was? ? ? Well if you don t I think you will enjoy the pleasure of learning about this energetic and hard working woman who made it possible for the world to look at women a different way. Elizabeth Blackwell made the goal that many women wanted comes true for the first time. Elizabeth Blackwell was born in Bristol, England on a brisk night, on February 3 rd, 1821 to the proud parents of Hannah and Samuel Blackwell. Elizabeth was the thi...
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  • Women And Children Elizabeth Blackwell

    672 words

    &# 9; Elizabeth Elizabeth Blackwell Elizabeth Blackwell &# 9; Elizabeth Blackwell was a great woman. She was the first woman to receive a Medical degree in America. She opened an Infirmary for women and children in New York. Elizabeth Blackwell was born on February 3 1821 in Bristol, England. But was raised differently then most children at this time. See women were treated differently than men. Women were given little education and were not allowed to hold important positions. They were not all...
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  • Women Movement Feminist Movement

    2,870 words

    Feminist Backlash: The Unconscious Undermining of Genuine Equality American people come in a variety of shapes and sizes; their thoughts, fears, and convictions differ widely. It is usually necessary for Americans to choose a status in politics and community; but it is obvious that among specific groups and organizations, a person? s beliefs and opinions differ dramatically from the next. Feminist groups, specifically in the last twenty years, have announced their view of membership as an elite ...
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  • Men And Women Women And Men

    2,589 words

    Feminist Backlash: The Unconscious Undermining of Genuine Equality American people come in a variety of shapes and sizes; their thoughts, fears, and convictions differ widely. It is usually necessary for Americans to choose a status in politics and community; but it is obvious that among specific groups and organizations, a persons beliefs and opinions differ dramatically from the next. Feminist groups, specifically in the last twenty years, have announced their view of membership as an elite gr...
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  • Commission On Human Rights Universal Declaration Of Human Rights

    2,829 words

    Running Head: INFLUENTIAL WOMEN Influential Women Delmy E Gooch Sociology and Philosophy of Gender Summer Evening Introduction There have been many women that have changed and shaped the role of women today. They opened the doors of opportunity for future women and made many contributions to our society. Some of these accomplishments have gone unnoticed. The reason that I chose to discuss the influential women of the past and present was because they are the ones that have given me a future. The...
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  • Susan B Anthony Rights For Women

    1,528 words

    Before the womens movements in the United States, women who were treated unfairly and not given any equal rights as men had suffered great tragedy. There tragedy was the way the society had treated them cruelly such as 1 women once only had the option of teaching, and nursing, as career opportunities. Women would usually have the role of staying home and taking care of children and the home. Now after the first and second waves of the womens movements, women now are treated with great respect an...
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When she graduated from New York's Geneva Medical College, in 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman in America to earn the M.D. degree. She supported medical education for women and helped many other women's careers. By establishing the New York Infirmary in 1857, she offered a practical solution to one of the problems facing women who were rejected from internships elsewhere but determined to expand their skills as physicians. She also published several important books on the issue of women in medicine, including Medicine as a Profession For Women in 1860 and Address on the Medical Education of Women in 1864.

Elizabeth Blackwell was born in Bristol, England in 1821, to Hannah Lane and Samuel Blackwell. Both for financial reasons and because her father wanted to help abolish slavery, the family moved to America when Elizabeth was 11 years old. Her father died in 1838. As adults, his children campaigned for women's rights and supported the anti-slavery movement.

In her book Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women, published in 1895, Dr. Blackwell wrote that she was initially repelled by the idea of studying medicine. She said she had "hated everything connected with the body, and could not bear the sight of a medical book... My favourite studies were history and metaphysics, and the very thought of dwelling on the physical structure of the body and its various ailments filled me with disgust." Instead she went into teaching, then considered more suitable for a woman. She claimed that she turned to medicine after a close friend who was dying suggested she would have been spared her worst suffering if her physician had been a woman.

Blackwell had no idea how to become a physician, so she consulted with several physicians known by her family. They told her it was a fine idea, but impossible; it was too expensive, and such education was not available to women. Yet Blackwell reasoned that if the idea were a good one, there must be some way to do it, and she was attracted by the challenge. She convinced two physician friends to let her read medicine with them for a year, and applied to all the medical schools in New York and Philadelphia. She also applied to twelve more schools in the northeast states and was accepted by Geneva Medical College in western New York state in 1847. The faculty, assuming that the all-male student body would never agree to a woman joining their ranks, allowed them to vote on her admission. As a joke, they voted "yes," and she gained admittance, despite the reluctance of most students and faculty.

Two years later, in 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman to receive an M.D. degree from an American medical school. She worked in clinics in London and Paris for two years, and studied midwifery at La Maternité where she contracted "purulent opthalmia" from a young patient. When Blackwell lost sight in one eye, she returned to New York City in 1851, giving up her dream of becoming a surgeon.

Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell established a practice in New York City, but had few patients and few opportunities for intellectual exchange with other physicians and "the means of increasing medical knowledge which dispensary practice affords." She applied for a job as physician at the women's department of a large city dispensary, but was refused. In 1853, with the help of friends, she opened her own dispensary in a single rented room, seeing patients three afternoons a week. The dispensary was incorporated in 1854 and moved to a small house she bought on 15th Street. Her sister, Dr. Emily Blackwell, joined her in 1856 and, together with Dr. Marie Zakrzewska, they opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children at 64 Bleecker Street in 1857. This institution and its medical college for women (opened 1867) provided training and experience for women doctors and medical care for the poor.

As her health declined, Blackwell gave up the practice of medicine in the late 1870s, though she still campaigned for reform.