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What U Want To Be In Future Essay Esl

Teaching is the best job. I enjoy every bit of my job. It has its ups and downs but on the whole it's fulfilling when you help youngsters to leave school with decent grades and know they have a future.

I love teaching. I revel in sharing learning with students who want to learn. The current celebrity culture where fame and money are obtained through how you look and what you possess seems all too often to make 'learning' an 'uncool' thing. The recent Cambridge research about 'being bland' in order to fit in does explain a great deal about the poor attitude to learning and the great effort made to avoid it (especially if it makes you a 'boff'). Praise for good learning has to be done in secret rather than celebrated in the open! I am tired of bureaucracy, targets, performance management, educational veneer for the sake of avoiding Ofsted and having to take on board initiative after initiative (PSHE, citizenship, being British, etc.) which once were the responsibility of parents. I don't believe standards are rising in examination results; students tend to be spoon-fed to pass the examinations and very few show genuine academic ability. This has been particularly noticeable in the transition between Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5. Students don't know how to think for themselves, how to organise themselves and how to meet deadlines. I think I've said enough - there is more that could be said. Lifelong learning - how can this be restored? Get rid of targets, return responsibilities and accountabilities to families, and let the professionals (teachers) advise.

Teaching is the best job. I enjoy every bit of my job. It has its ups and downs but on the whole it's fulfilling when you help youngsters to leave school with decent grades and know they have a future.

I teach in a lovely school where the vast majority of parents and pupils are very respectful and supportive of the school and the staff. I know that many teachers' experiences are very different to mine.

Sometimes it's the best job in the world and sometimes it's the worst job in the world!

We mustn't forget how lucky we are to do this job even though it can be difficult.

I love it. I love the students and their continuing ability to amaze me. I dislike the increasing duplicate paper work. Either on paper or the computer, but not both. Bureaucrats need to do some teacher shadowing to see how our jobs really work...or not.

However depressing the changes to teacher remuneration may be, once your classroom door is closed it is still a wonderful job!

I thoroughly enjoy teaching and making a difference in children's lives. It is an honour to be in this role. I feel torn between targets driven by government and knowing the children as individuals and giving them the best I can.

Children are people not targets! I wish for more freedom to do my job better and trust to do this rather than being driven by constantly changing paperwork!

Teaching is the best job ever. I love it.

I am planning to retire in the next three years, so am no longer interested in promotion. I was a latecomer to the teaching profession, and have never had a job I enjoyed as much or received as much satisfaction from. It is hard work though, and requires a lot of energy and commitment to do the job properly.
Teaching was never going to be an easy ride. It is for those who enjoy being challenged and enjoy children. It is not for those who want an easy job with 'a 12 week holiday' or people who do not like children. That is non-existent.

Teaching in the classroom is a joy. However, increasing redundancies and changes make the job more and more difficult. Planning has become more and more about ticking off criteria, decreasing the time available to produce creative, productive and effective planning. The new Ofsted criteria has been reduced so far that it could be interpreted in different ways. Yet another new curriculum must be introduced gradually to prevent rushed planning and poor teaching. Any new curriculum must come with training opportunities, INSET and time.

I love the children and usually they are a delight to be with....The problem is I just wonder if I'm good enough…

It's fantastic. Most interesting job I can imagine. Just wish that a) the workload could be more realistic and b) staff in 'tougher' schools could be more supported. I work in a high achieving large rural comprehensive with largely excellent behaviour and motivation and feel drained at the end of each day by the demands of the job - I dread to think how it feels to be doing all that PLUS dealing with much more intense behavioural/ etc issues.

Teaching is an incredibly rewarding job. The probationer system in Scotland has had a detrimental effect on the efficacy of our department, as the principal teacher is constantly working with an inexperienced teacher and never reaping the benefits once this member of staff is a few years into the job. The probationer system should be abolished.


Teaching is an incredibly rewarding job.

The School of the Future

Please note that this article was originally published in 1998. For a more up-to-date discussion about how technological advances can impact the classroom, please read Keith Lambert's article on the rise of Artificial Intelligence in education and what it could mean for the future of the teaching profession.

What shape the school of the future will take is amorphous, but most educators and observers agree that the future school will go electronic with a capital E.

Use Your Crystal Ball

Education World published this article almost twenty years ago. How accurate are the predictions? What you think today's future will bring? E-mail [email protected]
educationworld.com with your predictions for education in the next decade and we'll include them in a future article.

"Next century, schools as we know them will no longer exist," says a feature in The Age publication, based in Melbourne, Australia. "In their place will be community-style centers operating seven days a week, 24 hours a day." Computers will become an essential ingredient in the recipe for an effective school of the future.

Students, The Age asserts, will see and hear teachers on computers, with "remote learning" the trend of tomorrow. Accessing "classrooms" on their home computers, students will learn at times most convenient for them. Yet some attendance at an actual school will be required to help students develop appropriate social skills.

At Seashore Primary School, an imaginary school of the future created by the Education Department of Australia, technology is the glue that holds classes together. At the imaginary Seashore school:

  • all teachers and students have laptop computers.
  • teachers check voicemail and return students' calls on a special telephone system.
  • students use telephones to find information or speak to experts in subject areas they are studying.
  • all lessons are multidisciplinary.
  • all students have individual learning plans created by teachers.

As Seashore's acting principal says, a laptop computer is the students' "library, homework, data storage, and connection to the wider world. (Technology) has changed the emphasis to the learning of kids rather than the teaching of kids."

A Real-Life School of the Future

Right here in the United States are public schools that strive to bring the future into the present. One of those schools, A.C.T. Academy in McKinney, Texas, was created as an actual "school of the future." Originally funded by a $5.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the school is now supported by the McKinney Independent School District.

At the school, knowledge is "actively constructed by the learner on a base of prior knowledge, attitudes, and values." Sophisticated technology is in place to support the pursuit of knowledge.

The 250 Academy students all have access to a computer. The 12- to 18-year-olds each have their own computer; 7- to 11-year-olds have one portable computer for every two students; and 5- and 6-year-olds use computers at fixed stations. In addition, the students use multimedia computers, printers, CD-ROMs, laserdiscs, VCRs, video editing machines, camcorders, cable television, online services, and telephones -- simple but effective research tools.

A.C.T. Academy has formed community partnerships and business mentorships to foster students' learning experiences. The school is also in partnerships with other schools, colleges, universities, and research centers. The goal: to learn through all the different kinds of resources that real life offers.

Teachers assess student learning through portfolios and creative performance tasks. Again, the object is to use real-life approaches to assessment.

Working Toward Future Schools

The Center for the School of the Future (CSF) is the brainchild of the College of Education at Utah State University. The center's main goals involve the creation and maintenance of a U.S. educational system that improves by selecting the most effective teaching practices. The mission of the center is to:

  • identify the most effective teaching approaches, techniques, and ideologies,
  • encourage innovations and their adaptation to specific circumstances,
  • assist the creation of a community of parents and teachers who support each other in improving schools.

The CSF is forming a Research and Best Practice Clearinghouse, a Parent Academy, and a Teacher Academy. Those organizations will contribute to the creation of model schools. Such model schools, according to the CSF, will stand for:

  • "equity and excellence,"
  • teaching of basic skills combined with creative problem-solving,
  • respect for individual values as well as diversity,
  • preparation for democracy as well as a world economy.

Technology Is Key

Whatever the configuration of a school of the future might be, technology is always a huge part of it. Ginger Howenic, a consultant and director for The Classroom of the Future Foundation, recently made a presentation in the Lake Washington (Washington) School District. She was joined by Robert Clarke, executive director of the National School Co. Both emphasized technology.

Howenic formerly headed Clear View Elementary School, a charter school, in Chula Vista, California. At the presentation, she played a video from the school in which two boys studied bee anatomy with the help of an electron microscope and two professors. At the school, Hovenic says, kindergarten students use spreadsheets to track their height and weight through sixth grade.

Clarke's company offers SONY Web TV packages to school districts for $207 per unit. The packages provide Internet access through regular televisions, assisting students whose families do not own computers.

The school days when computers meant word processing or playing games are already behind us. Yet no matter how great a part computers and other technologies play in the school of the future, it is only a means, advocates of technology say, to the greater end of enabling students to learn through interaction with various aspects of life.

Article by Sharon Cromwell
Education World
Copyright © 1998 Education World
Please note that this article has not been updated since 1998.