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Coursework Development Gender

In the current context of rapid social, economic, technological and environmental changes in Asia, it is imperative to understand the effects of change on various sub-groups: women, men, indigenous peoples, different classes, and other social groups. Gender and Development Studies (GDS) highlights both the need for specialized academic degree awarding studies in gender and development, and the integration of gender analysis and gender relation perspectives in AIT’s other fields of study. GDS offers graduate level courses and provides substantial input to student’s masters and PhD dissertation research. Short courses and workshops are also offered on gender planning and gender analysis in various development fields.

By functioning as an academic arm of community-based efforts for the advancement of women and sustainable development, GDS aims to work as a regional center of excellence in the field of gender, technology and development studies, and to integrate gender as a key intellectual perspective and ethical concern in AIT as well.

By functioning as an academic arm of community-based efforts for the advancement of women and sustainable development, GDS aims to work as a regional center of excellence in the field of gender, technology and development studies, and to integrate gender as a key intellectual perspective and ethical concern in AIT as well.

Coursework and Research areas

The curriculum offered by the Gender and Development Studies program includes courses in:

  • Gender and Development: Principles and Concepts
  • Gender and Economics Development
  • Gender, Culture and Human Development
  • New Technologies, Industrialization and Gender
  • Gender Politics, Civil Society and Human Rights
  • Gender, Enterprise, and Organizations
  • Gender, Rural Livelihoods and Sustainable Development
  • Gender Analysis and Gender Responsive Development Planning
  • Gender, Migration and Human Trafficking in Asia
  • Gender, Urbanization and Urban Management
  • Gender and Health
Career for Graduates

Graduates emerge prepared for professional work in government, non-government and international development sectors, with the ability to apply gender analysis in technical and development fields.

Overview

The MA Gender Analysis in International Development degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities.

We offer a broad training integrating theory and development policy experience which is both sectoral (eg education; land and property; credit and finance; rural livelihoods; sustainable development, environment and conservation; HIV/AIDS) and cross cutting, (eg migration, and male gender identities and masculinities in development).

This Masters has been taught in the School since 1990, when we judged there to be a need for people with an advanced social science expertise in gender analysis to contribute to development policy formulation, practical development activities and development education and research. The intervening years have certainly shown this to be the case. Our graduates are employed in the World Bank, the UK DFID, and other bilateral aid agencies, and in large international NGOs like Oxfam as well as in developing country government departments and as academics.

Students on the course will study both the theory and practice of gender in development, to provide the skills and knowledge needed to work in an advisory capacity for organisations concerned with integrating gender awareness into their programmes and policies. The course emphasises the development of research techniques and methods that are essential not only for further academic research, but also in practical development work and policy formulation, such as gender planning, and  gender policy approaches such as mainstreaming.

The MA Gender Analysis of International Development degree is offered over one year full-time, or two years part-time.

Course Profile 

Our Masters courses require students to undertake 180 credits:

  • Compulsory and Optional modules (120 credits)
  • Examination (20 credits)
  • Dissertation (40 credits)

Students will receive detailed module outlines, including information about lectures and seminars, full reading lists and assessments once they have registered at the beginning of their course.

Professional, Employability and Practical Skills

A range of optional seminars and workshops are offered during your Masters programme for the teaching and strengthening of student skills. Sessions to support learning - in particular essay and dissertation writing - occur throughout the year. Development practice training is also provided. Please click to access further information about the Skills Training and Development Practice programme.

The Gender and Development Research Group

Research in the School of International Development addresses contemporary challenges in developing and transition economies via disciplinary and multi/interdisciplinary approaches. Research is organised into a series of Research Groups. Please click to access further information about the Gender and Development Research Group and our current research projects.

Student Testimonial

“Both the study and the network I built during the year proved very useful when I went back to work in the Indonesian Ministry of Finance.”

Paramita, MA Gender Analysis and International Development

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

This module equips you with the knowledge and skills to understand and explore relations between social policies, practice and key actors in addressing various forms of difference and diversity, with a particular focus on gender. You will develop analytical and conceptual skills to critically assess social policies - including gender - and social development at the international, national and institutional levels. This module considers current issues of gender and a range of intersecting inequalities (e.g. disability, migrant status) with reference to addressing social exclusion and deficit modes of development. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, and you will have the opportunity to work on your own projects through linked seminar sessions.

DEV-7024B

20

The aim of this module is to provide you with a solid grounding in gender analysis of development, and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module introduces and explains the range of ideas, debates and tools, which are the foundations of gender analysis, within a discussion of key issues in gender analysis of development: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, and environmental change. The unit stands alone as a foundation for gender analysis of development, it also builds the necessary basis for the more applied units which follow in the spring semester, and for dissertations based on gender topics. If you are writing a dissertation on a gender topic you will need to have completed this module.

DEV-7003A

20

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Gender Analysis in International Development.

DEV-7007B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Autumn Semester Options. Students must select 20 credits from Option Range A.

Poverty and hunger remain key developmental challenges, driving poor health and ill-being on the one hand and conflict and violence on the other. This is the central question addressed by this module. In this module, you will explore different approaches to understanding rural livelihoods. You will be equipped with the tools and frameworks to critically assess different strategies for livelihoods-building and their implications for poverty and inequality, including those of class and gender, at the micro-level. Starting with an understanding of key concepts of poverty, food security, gender, capabilities, capitals and entitlements, you will apply these to a host of contexts and programmes through seminar discussions. This will enable a deeper understanding of the interconnections between the wider policy context, the social structure that shapes entitlements, the assets available to groups and individuals and their livelihood strategies. You will also explore the links between the rural and urban, and the changes over time. You will have an opportunity to experience some of the dilemmas confronting the rural poor through an experiential game.

DEV-7020A

20

Effective social development and policy are based on sound conceptual foundations, and this module focuses on the conceptual tools that underpin policy relevant social analysis. You will develop skills to analyse social contexts which influence interventions and social change ('development'), using concepts from sociology, anthropology and political analysis. There is an old development adage that 'if you give a man a fish you feed him for a day, but if you give him a fishing rod you feed him for a lifetime'. Think about social theory and concepts as a fishing rod! The module is about social concepts and theory, but we always apply these concepts to practical social development issues and interventions. You will apply your knowledge and understanding of social concepts to important international development issues, for example (and these can vary each year) the social analysis of HIV, the social analysis of poverty and micro-credit interventions, or the social analysis of conflict and peace.

DEV-7021A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

The broad aim of the module Advanced Qualitative Research and Analysis (AQRA) is to prepare students who already have a basic grasp of qualitative research methods for carrying out data analysis using different techniques. It will also aim at understanding how to link research questions, theory and methods and the research design more generally, as well as how to collect and manage data, and produce a piece of written work from the data. Coursework will therefore involve producing a piece of written analysis based on existing qualitative datasets. Examples of tecnhiques covered are semi-structured and life history interviews, focus groups, and participant observation. Classes will be practice-oriented in a workshop format, where students can experiement with conducting discourse analysis, thematic analysis, and narrative analysis of the datasets that will be provided.

DEV-7036B

20

The number of violent intrastate conflicts has outweighed the number of violent interstate conflicts for more than five decades. Yet it was only with the end of the Cold War that academics and policy-makers started paying more attention to the possible causes and consequences of large-scale intrastate violence. Today, questions of effective conflict management, especially of large-scale civil wars, are among the top priorities of international development agencies. The aim of the "Conflict, Civil Wars and Peace" module is to critically assess the possible causes and consequences of violent intrastate conflicts as well as their implications for the wider development agenda. Key topics to be discussed in the module include causes, dynamics and consequences of different types of violent conflict, strategies and causes of terrorism, the role of gender during and after violent intrastate conflicts, the (contested) relationship(s) between natural resource wealth and civil wars, institutional approaches to conflict management, the rationale and possible effects of third-party intervention in civil wars, and post-conflict reconstruction efforts, including state- and peace-building as well as transitional justice. Throughout the module, you will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as the role of gender during the Rwandan genocide in 1994 or the performance of Bosnia and Herzegovina's post-civil war power-sharing arrangement.

DEV-7015B

20

The objective of Contemporary World Development is to examine key debates around development objectives, processes and agencies. While issues discussed here are of contemporary significance, references will be made to the historical contexts in which these debates have arisen. Concerns central to development policy making will be reviewed through theoretically grounded critical perspectives. Topics covered include the Millennium Development Goals, donors and aid politics, state and non-governmental organisations, and poverty.

DEV-7000B

20

You will develop an advanced understanding of some of the challenges and changes in aid delivery that are introduced in Critical Issues in Development Practice 1, in the autumn semesters. Together these modules serve as the core foundations for the MA in Development Practice. With the grounding the previous module provides, Critical Issues in Development Practice 2 will expand your understanding to new different areas of concern and practice, across a wide range of approaches and topics in contemporary aid delivery. Themes explored will include specific approaches to aid delivery, such as human rights based approaches to development, and how this intersects with concerns around good governance as a key pillar for development. You will also be exposed to debates about global aid architecture and institutions, and wider global conditions in which aid operates, including around the politicisation of aid and the implications of the 'securitisation' agenda. A complementary strand of the module will examine shifting parameters of aid delivery, including around businesses and private sector involvement, for example in how public private partnerships might operate for the sustainable development goals. Examining such approaches includes considering the potential conceptual contradictions underlying social or human development objectives and business motives, and ways forward, such as looking at business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and social enterprise. The overall goal is to give you a deep and broad understanding of the key issues driving change in the sector for coming decades.

DEV-7052B

20

The aim of this module is to help you understand and critically examine, policy-making processes and specific policies for educational development. You will discover the relationships between policy and practice in a range of international, national and local development contexts. Through this module you will explore different approaches to policy development and familiarise yourself with dominant global policy agendas in education - asking who makes or influences policy, and considering policies as socially situated documents, practices and processes. The module introduces you to educational policy-making to address a range of development challenges and how related strategies are enacted in practice; drawing on policy theory and ethnographic and school-based research, as well as practical sessions to unpack the approaches and skills needed for successful advocacy and campaigning.

DEV-7011B

20

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While we look at health issues in general, we pay particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-7027B

20

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and within most developing countries the gap between the rural poor and better off urban residents continues to widen. The lives of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews important policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies and Politics recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic and political contexts, as well as in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas including globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, and rapid technological change.

DEV-7004B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Dissertation or Development Work Placement.

This module gives you an opportunity to identify, apply for and do an internship or work placement, worth 40 credits, as an integral part of your Masters programme. You would take this module in the summer semester as an alternative to the Dissertation module, and it is open to most MA /MSc programmes. The placements are for a period of 8-10 weeks between May and, preferably, the end of July. In recent years, students have done placements across a range of United Nations institutions, in specialist consultancy and research organisations, and non governmental organisations both in the UK and across the world. You are responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from Development which includes giving you access to the Development internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. The module is assessed by the production of an Analytical Report based on the internship which allows you to reflect both on the content of the placement, and the personal expense of undertaking this work

DEV-7026X

40

You will be required to produce a short (8000-12000 words) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-7013X

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

.

The module offers you a critical introduction to and perspectives on development interventions. A key goal of the module is to provide you with a critical and comprehensive overview of project management, how humanitarian management differs, and the innovations shaping contemporary development practice. The module does this by setting out key aspects of development practice, from the tools used in development planning such as project management cycles to complexity theory, and taking a critical and analytical approach to their implications. We start off with a review of the overarching history of development interventions and thought, exploring how different approaches have been used over the years, with varying effects and influenced by varied political agendas. This includes trends in aid finance, which provides an important framing for then exploring how projects are constructed, with tools such as log frames and monitoring and evaluation plans, the variations when planning a rapid onset humanitarian intervention, and how overall planning systems and actors shape these processes. The module will help you understand how the diversity of development actors and agencies, their positionality and their interactions, shape interventions and affect their ability to have positive impact. We also reflect on these from an anthropological perspective, standing away from the development enterprise and thinking critically about how those involved in aid are also challenged by the processes in which they are involved.

DEV-7052A

20

You will explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. You will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualised, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. You will cover topics including modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-7001A

20

"Good governance" and durable democracy are key items on the international development agenda. However, despite their prominence in the development discourse, it remains contested not only how to achieve these political development goals, but also how to define them in the first place. The aim of the andquot;Governance, Democracy and Developmentandquot; module is to critically assess the possible definitions, contested causes and arguable consequences of "good governance" and democracy. Key topics to be discussed in the module include how to define and measure democracy and "good governance", explanations for the emergence of democracy, theories on the survival of democracy and dictatorship, local forms of governance and democracy, aid and governance, trust and cooperation, the effects of democracy and dictatorship on prospects of economic development, and key challenges to democracy in the 21st century. Throughout the module, you will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as political regime trends in Turkey or the economic effects of recent elections in Kenya.

DEV-7023A

20

The aim of the module is for you to gain an understanding of current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce you to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. You will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-7002A

20

The media play an increasingly important role in international development - from promoting mass mobilisation and participation to facilitating the flow of information locally, nationally and internationally. Media are also central to encouraging charitable donations, promoting democracy and human rights, and delivering public health messages during emergencies. The aim of this module is to provide you with a critical introduction to the broad range of issues relevant to the relationship between media and development. It addresses the fields of development communication, media development and media representations of development. This module is accessible to development students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-7030A

20

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are shown based on tools such as Excel, SPSS and STATA.

DEV-7005A

20

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. You will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. You will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop your own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular you should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-7014A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

The broad aim of the module Advanced Qualitative Research and Analysis (AQRA) is to prepare students who already have a basic grasp of qualitative research methods for carrying out data analysis using different techniques. It will also aim at understanding how to link research questions, theory and methods and the research design more generally, as well as how to collect and manage data, and produce a piece of written work from the data. Coursework will therefore involve producing a piece of written analysis based on existing qualitative datasets. Examples of tecnhiques covered are semi-structured and life history interviews, focus groups, and participant observation. Classes will be practice-oriented in a workshop format, where students can experiement with conducting discourse analysis, thematic analysis, and narrative analysis of the datasets that will be provided.

DEV-7036B

20

The number of violent intrastate conflicts has outweighed the number of violent interstate conflicts for more than five decades. Yet it was only with the end of the Cold War that academics and policy-makers started paying more attention to the possible causes and consequences of large-scale intrastate violence. Today, questions of effective conflict management, especially of large-scale civil wars, are among the top priorities of international development agencies. The aim of the "Conflict, Civil Wars and Peace" module is to critically assess the possible causes and consequences of violent intrastate conflicts as well as their implications for the wider development agenda. Key topics to be discussed in the module include causes, dynamics and consequences of different types of violent conflict, strategies and causes of terrorism, the role of gender during and after violent intrastate conflicts, the (contested) relationship(s) between natural resource wealth and civil wars, institutional approaches to conflict management, the rationale and possible effects of third-party intervention in civil wars, and post-conflict reconstruction efforts, including state- and peace-building as well as transitional justice. Throughout the module, you will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as the role of gender during the Rwandan genocide in 1994 or the performance of Bosnia and Herzegovina's post-civil war power-sharing arrangement.

DEV-7015B

20

The objective of Contemporary World Development is to examine key debates around development objectives, processes and agencies. While issues discussed here are of contemporary significance, references will be made to the historical contexts in which these debates have arisen. Concerns central to development policy making will be reviewed through theoretically grounded critical perspectives. Topics covered include the Millennium Development Goals, donors and aid politics, state and non-governmental organisations, and poverty.

DEV-7000B

20